basement hopper windows sizes 10

basement hopper windows sizes 10
photograph basement hopper windows sizes 10
photograph basement hopper windows sizes 10

See Things Differently With Windows From Lowe's Are you looking for windows for your new house or replacement windows for your existing home? You'll find a wide selection to suit your style and needs at Lowe's. Explore our selection of double hung windows, single hung windows, sliding windows, casement windows, accent windows, double pane windows and awning windows. If you need to stick to a tight budget, you may want to look into vinyl windows. Add skylights to let in additional daylight. Increase your privacy with glass block windows or choose from a variety of blinds and shades. Looking to revamp the outside of your home? Bay windows are a beautiful addition to the inside and outside of the house. Exterior shutters can give your home a whole new look. If you’ve got a green thumb, a garden window is a great way to display your plants and give them the sunlight they need. Egress windows are not as common and have specific size requirements, but are very important if you need to exit your home in an emergency. If part of your basement is above ground, install basement windows to bring light into the space. Make sure you have the correct window screen and window coverings to add an extra layer of protection. If you are looking for a reliable and energy efficient window, JELD-WEN windows are a good option to consider. Not sure which windows are right for you? Schedule a FREE in-home consultation or explore our Windows Buying Guide to find the right fit. After you've made your decision, trust Lowe's for your window installation so you can start enjoying your view.


Are you looking for windows for your new house or replacement windows for your existing home? You'll find a wide selection to suit your style and needs at Lowe's. Explore our selection of double hung windows, single hung windows, sliding windows, casement windows, accent windows, double pane windows and awning windows. If you need to stick to a tight budget, you may want to look into vinyl windows. Add skylights to let in additional daylight. Increase your privacy with glass block windows or choose from a variety of blinds and shades. Looking to revamp the outside of your home? Bay windows are a beautiful addition to the inside and outside of the house. Exterior shutters can give your home a whole new look. If you’ve got a green thumb, a garden window is a great way to display your plants and give them the sunlight they need. Egress windows are not as common and have specific size requirements, but are very important if you need to exit your home in an emergency. If part of your basement is above ground, install basement windows to bring light into the space. Make sure you have the correct window screen and window coverings to add an extra layer of protection. If you are looking for a reliable and energy efficient window, JELD-WEN windows are a good option to consider. Not sure which windows are right for you? Schedule a FREE in-home consultation or explore our Windows Buying Guide to find the right fit. After you've made your decision, trust Lowe's for your window installation so you can start enjoying your view.


Some older homes were built before there were any egress window requirements. Many more homes were built when the egress window net free opening size was a mere 4.3 sq. ft. Yet even newer homes often lack proper egress windows. Attics and basements were often legally remodeled into family rooms or offices (which didn't require egress windows) then later converted into bedrooms (which now do require them). When bedrooms are added to basements without the knowledge of inspectors and without the requisite egress window, they create a dangerous underground fire trap. During remodeling, homeowners often unwittingly replace large egress windows with smaller, non-egress windows. And while most inspectors will demand egress windows be installed when bedrooms are remodeled or added on, they won't necessarily dictate that windows in existing bedrooms be enlarged to egress size; it's simply too difficult to monitor every situation.


Window wells must: Allow the rescue window opening to be fully opened. Provide 9 sq. ft. of “floor area,” with a minimum dimension of 36 in. in width and in length. Contain a permanently affixed ladder or steps for climbing out if the window well depth exceeds 44 in. The ladder must be at least 12 in. wide and project no less than 3 in. from the window well. It can't be obstructed by the open window or encroach on the required window well dimensions by more than 6 in. If you build the window well from timbers or modular concrete blocks, you can create steps along one side, eliminating the need for a ladder. We're not done yet. If an egress window is located under a deck or porch, inspectors and firefighters want at least 36 in. between the top of the window well and the bottom of the deck or porch joists; they much prefer 60 in. If the bottom of your egress opening is more than 44 in. from the basement floor, some inspectors will allow you to make up the difference with a permanently attached step. This sounds like a lot of rigmarole and it is. Installing basement egress windows is challenging. You need to excavate a large hole, cut through and remove concrete, install a large window and window well, keep the basement walls watertight and somehow make the entire thing look good when you're finished. It's a huge project—but ask the family whose flaming television blocked their exit from the basement; they'll tell you how glad they were to have had an egress window.


This sounds like a lot of rigmarole and it is. Installing basement egress windows is challenging. You need to excavate a large hole, cut through and remove concrete, install a large window and window well, keep the basement walls watertight and somehow make the entire thing look good when you're finished. It's a huge project—but ask the family whose flaming television blocked their exit from the basement; they'll tell you how glad they were to have had an egress window.


The old saying “Always leave yourself an out” is especially true when it comes to home fires. When the basement stairs are blocked by a flaming television (true story), or fire and thick, black smoke are racing down a hallway toward a dead-end bedroom, windows that are large enough for you to escape—and for firefighters to enter—become essential lifesaving equipment. These all-important escape hatches are called egress windows.


Codes require new homes to have the proper size basement and bedroom egress windows. But if you live in an older, “pre-owned” home, open your windows fully, pull out a tape measure and see if the opening meets current egress requirements. Multiply the width by the height of the opening to determine whether it's the required 5.7 sq. ft., or 821 sq. in.


Awning windows are problematic. Since the opened sash prevents escape from most window wells, they're unsuitable for basement egress. And with most awning windows, the opening hardware and height don't meet egress requirements. Some manufacturers offer models with detachable operators that meet egress requirements.


Gliding windows: To meet egress requirements, these horizontally sliding windows must be at least 4 ft. wide and 4 ft. high. This extra glass area and the light it lets in are pretty darn nice in a basement area, if you have the space.


Figure F: Minimum size awning egress window Awning windows are problematic. Since the opened sash prevents escape from most window wells, they're unsuitable for basement egress. And with most awning windows, the opening hardware and height don't meet egress requirements. Some manufacturers offer models with detachable operators that meet egress requirements.


When it comes to egress, not all windows are created equal. Figures C – F show how any style window can meet egress requirements—some just do it more space efficiently than others. As you remodel, you'll want new egress windows that match the style of the existing windows and meet egress requirements. This can be a challenge. Bear in mind these pros and cons.


Basement egress windows present an added challenge. Besides the height, width and overall square-footage requirements that the window must meet, there are certain requirements for the window well surrounding the window.


Double-hung windows: Even when it's fully open, more than half of a double-hung window's overall area is blocked by glass. This means that to meet egress window height requirements, a window must be nearly 4 ft. 9 in. in overall height. This height requirement takes it out of the running for most basement egress situations.


Glass blocks are a good option for some cases. However if the basement area is to be occupied as a living space, particularly as a permanent bedroom, there are many areas that require that there be egress windows that would allow a person to escape in the case of fire or other disaster. Glass blocks do not fit that usage model. – Michael Karas Sep 24 '12 at 3:17

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