Bathroom Sink Image

Bathroom Sink Image

Sell on Houzz – Learn MoreWhich type of bathroom sink is best in a small space?If you have limited floor space, freestanding bathroom sinks, also known as console sinks, are ideal as they provide style and function without taking up too much visual space. Alternatively, a wall-mounted wash basin can be a great solution if you want to preserve as much floor space as possible and don’t need a full-blown vanity. A pedestal sink also takes up minimal space and hides all of the plumbing, but as with any small bathroom, storage can be an issue, so be sure to add wall cabinets or shelves if needed. Which bathroom sinks work best for a large or master bath?Your master suite should be the most luxurious washroom in the house, and vanity-mounted bath sinks are the best option for both aesthetics and storage. With that comes a few different mounting options. Undermount bathroom sinks create a clean, seamless look, and allow you to place the emphasis on the countertop and vanity base. If you want the wash basin to be the star of the show, try a vessel sink basin that sits atop the counter. If you have the space, two bathroom sinks are always better than one! For the main family bathroom, try a deep-basin sink — it can double as a spot to soak clothes or even bathe pets and babies. How do I decide on a bathroom sink material?Although a porcelain unit is often the go-to choice, there are many other options, if you care to venture out. For something that ages well and adds rich color, try a copper or bronze bath sink. For a slick, modern look, opt for stainless steel, stone or colored glass. And for an interesting, eclectic approach, try a bright tile wash basin. If you’re wary of a new material, try a new shape instead; round, oval, rectangular and square are common options, or you can go custom with a design of your own. Either way, be sure to consider your space’s overall style and have your bathroom sink complement that feel.
bathroom sink image 1

Bathroom Sink Image

Which type of bathroom sink is best in a small space?If you have limited floor space, freestanding bathroom sinks, also known as console sinks, are ideal as they provide style and function without taking up too much visual space. Alternatively, a wall-mounted wash basin can be a great solution if you want to preserve as much floor space as possible and don’t need a full-blown vanity. A pedestal sink also takes up minimal space and hides all of the plumbing, but as with any small bathroom, storage can be an issue, so be sure to add wall cabinets or shelves if needed. Which bathroom sinks work best for a large or master bath?Your master suite should be the most luxurious washroom in the house, and vanity-mounted bath sinks are the best option for both aesthetics and storage. With that comes a few different mounting options. Undermount bathroom sinks create a clean, seamless look, and allow you to place the emphasis on the countertop and vanity base. If you want the wash basin to be the star of the show, try a vessel sink basin that sits atop the counter. If you have the space, two bathroom sinks are always better than one! For the main family bathroom, try a deep-basin sink — it can double as a spot to soak clothes or even bathe pets and babies. How do I decide on a bathroom sink material?Although a porcelain unit is often the go-to choice, there are many other options, if you care to venture out. For something that ages well and adds rich color, try a copper or bronze bath sink. For a slick, modern look, opt for stainless steel, stone or colored glass. And for an interesting, eclectic approach, try a bright tile wash basin. If you’re wary of a new material, try a new shape instead; round, oval, rectangular and square are common options, or you can go custom with a design of your own. Either way, be sure to consider your space’s overall style and have your bathroom sink complement that feel.
bathroom sink image 2

Bathroom Sink Image

Measure the new sink to make sure it fits the space. All new sinks should come with a template of the mounting opening, marking the location of the faucet holes, including a cutout for the sink. You can use the template to make sure the sink fits in the desired location. If it doesn’t, you may need to do some trimming or, or cut the entire opening if you’re installing a sink in a house under construction. Most new sinks come with clips and screws that are used to hold the sink in place. If you buy a faucet, sometimes it’ll come with the drain and tailpiece for the sink. If it isn’t included, get one before you start. The supply lines for the faucet need to correspond to the faucet and valves under the sink, so make sure they match before you get started.
bathroom sink image 3

Bathroom Sink Image

Remove the old sink, if necessary. If you’re replacing a sink, you’ll obviously need to remove the sink that’s in place before installing the new one. Disconnect the supply and drain lines from the faucet, using locking pliers or a crescent wrench. A small amount of water may leak out when you do this, which is normal. Just use a bucket or a towel to handle the water that leaks out. Locate the large nut that connects the sink to the drain and disconnect it. This metal or plastic nut will be located either in the wall or the floor. Use your hands or locking pliers to unscrew the nut. Remove the current sink by sliding the edge of a putty knife around the perimeter of the bathroom sink, loosening any caulk that connects it. Pull it loose.
bathroom sink image 4

Bathroom Sink Image

Put the sink in place and caulk it. Put a thin bead of silicone around the bottom lip of the sink and set it into the hole. Clean up any excess silicone or smooth a line. Depending on the design of the sink and the opening where it connects to the plumbing lines, you may need to caulk in any number of different places. For undermount sinks, put a bead of silicone under, have someone hold the sink in place, and install the connecting clips included with the sink. You might have to pre-drill holes with a diamond carbide tip if you’re installing the sink in a granite/stone counter.
bathroom sink image 5

Bathroom Sink Image

Turn off the water supply valves. Typically located beneath the sink, it’s critical that you shut off the water supply to the sink before you remove it. If the valves are not beneath the sink, then you’ll have to turn off the main water supply. This is typically located on a lower level or the basement near the water meter. To test, turn on the hot and cold water on your sink and make sure no water comes out before proceeding.
bathroom sink image 6

Bathroom Sink Image

Secure the sink with clips. Connective clips are often included with new sinks to help anchor the units into place, in addition to the sealing caulk. The design of this varies, and will depend on the type of sink and the design, but they usually act like a lever to hold the sink in place. Follow the instructions included with the new sink and defer to the manufacturer’s guidelines.
bathroom sink image 7

Bathroom Sink Image

The finished bathroom in the Reis home, has a glamorous and sophisticated feel, featuring ceiling details, marble tile and a alluring pallette to add a romantic quality to the space. The mirrored wall, built in vanity, freestanding sink and crown molding give this tiny bathroom a charming and elegant feel as seen on DIY Network’s, I Hate My Bath. This bathroom is now large enough and sophisticated in style for her and her new husband to share. After #
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Whether you’re installing a new sink in a recently constructed home or replacing an old one, you can learn to plan properly and install your new sink securely. While different sinks will need to be installed depending on the variations of the kit you’re using, the basic steps in the process are usually the same. Learn how to assemble and fit your new sink into place quickly and efficiently.
bathroom sink image 9

Install the faucet. New faucets usually screw onto the faucet assembly in a clockwise direction. Some faucets will have a rubber gasket around the base, and screw on easily, while others will recommend using silicone sealant to secure to the sink or counter. You can anchor the faucet by reaching up underneath and using lock nuts that are included with the installation kit. Sometimes it may be easier to install the faucet before the sink, depending on the design of the counter and the fixtures. Make sure the space for the faucet matches the location of the sink, using the template to measure before you install anything.

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